Aug 14 2006

Guest Blogger: PJ Perez

Published by at 3:47 pm under General Music Business,Marketing,Other

Today we have a guest post by PJ Perez, an entertainment writer who is featured regularly on Vegas.com, in the Las Vegas Weekly, and runs VegasInsight.net (amongst a million other publications)…

How NOT to Get Your Band Promoted
By Pj Perez

Undoubtedly, the job of any public relations firm or press agent is to get its client’s name or event into as many media outlets as possible. Tenacity can be a boon in this area, but there is a thin line between tenacity and tediousness. One PR rep completely trashed that line this week, demonstrating “what not to do to get your band decent press.”

I received a call from an L.A.-based PR firm Thursday last week. The rather assertive voice on the other end of the phone wanted to send some press releases about a couple bands he represents that are playing in Vegas this week. I gave him the appropriate contact info and assured him we’d get the calendar on our websites updated with the show info.

The bands are playing as part of a three-day competition/festival in downtown Las Vegas, which means they received only a small listing mention on a larger page dedicated to the entire showcase.

The press agent called to follow-up on Friday. I let him know about the music festival’s pending listing on our websites, and that he could look for it over the weekend.

When I came into the office Monday morning, I had another phone message waiting for me from the same PR guy, claiming that he could not find the listing anywhere on the website. At this point, I realize the guy is nuts, but I don’t bother calling back, because I had more important things to attend to, like ensuring shows we actually sell are live on the websites.

He called again a few hours into the day, explaining again that he could not find the listing on the website. Now I realize he’s not only obnoxious, but he’s not that bright. A simple search in our calendar for any part of the name of the music conference/festival would have resulted in the listings for which he was looking. I nearly screamed after I tossed my headset at the phone.

Next time this guy calls up and needs press for his clients, I will be less likely to even bother. He did both himself and his bands a disservice by becoming a pest and obsessing over all the wrong things.

There’s a lesson here, and as usual, it has much to do with the delicate balance of power between public relations and the media. I’ll let you draw your own conclusions.

3 responses so far

3 Responses to “Guest Blogger: PJ Perez”

  1. Cocotasoon 21 Aug 2006 at 1:51 am

    I can sympathize completely with you on that one. Some artists have totally inept people doing their PR and don’t realize the damage that they do by not properly following up with people. Mess up with the wrong person and you can find yourself out of a great deal of pub.

  2. [...] After Napster, Sean Fanning founded SNOCAP, in hopes of promoting peer-to-peer networking, but the company has since evolved into a provider of digital licensing and copyright management services for artists exploring the new digital music marketplace. Rusty Rueff is the current CEO of the company. He spoke with PodTech’s Michael Johnson at the Bandwidth music & technology conference in San Francisco. Reporter’s notes: So it looks like peer to peer is here to stay, and in the music business it’s becoming SOP. P.J. Perez has an amusing story about band that could have used some professional help promoting their brand. Songwriter Imogen Heap’s website is a design marvel, craftily employing social media to promote songs and tours. Perhaps she’ll appear in another podcast to talk about her gaggle of tech devices she uses to perform her music. [...]

  3. [...] After Napster, Sean Fanning founded SNOCAP, in hopes of promoting peer-to-peer networking, but the company has since evolved into a provider of digital licensing and copyright management services for artists exploring the new digital music marketplace. Rusty Rueff is the current CEO of the company. He spoke with PodTech’s Michael Johnson at the Bandwidth music & technology conference in San Francisco. Reporter’s notes: So it looks like peer to peer is here to stay, and in the music business it’s becoming SOP. P.J. Perez has an amusing story about band that could have used some professional help promoting their brand. Songwriter Imogen Heap’s website is a design marvel, craftily employing social media to promote songs and tours. Perhaps she’ll appear in another podcast to talk about her gaggle of tech devices she uses to perform her music. [...]

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